• MICRH_65_STILL
  • 307639437_ae1b3ba8c5_b
  • Mark Segal New Still
  • 1202600.jpg
  • jamesjackson2
  • hailing

Most Recent

307639437_ae1b3ba8c5_b

How The Loving v. Virginia Ruling Endures Today

The Legacy
The Legacy
The landmark Supreme Court case paved the way for the gay marriage movement.
MICRH_65_STILL

June 12, 1967 – US Supreme Court Strikes Down Bans on Interracial Marriage

Civil Rights History
The Movement
On June 12, 1967, the Court unanimously decided Loving v. Virginia in favor of the Lovings, an interracial, married couple from Caroline County, VA.
Mark Segal New Still

Gay Rights Pioneer Mark Segal on the LGBT and Civil Rights Movements

The Legacy
The Legacy
"We had one difference between the African American plight and our own. We were an invisible group of people ... People didn't know who LGBT people were."
1202600.jpg

June 7, 1920: Ku Klux Klan Mounts Publicity Campaign to Attract Members

Civil Rights History
The Movement
On June 7, 1920, the recently revived Ku Klux Klan hired publicists in an effort to increase membership.
jannieprice

Janie Price, Hosted Dr. King at her Home in St. Augustine

The Movement
The Movement
"I went to Jacksonville to meet (Dr. King) on the plane, and the Klan also followed us."
hailing

Dr. Robert Hayling, the “Father of the Civil Rights Movement in St. Augustine

The Movement
The Movement
"They shot with high-powered rifles through the front door of that house, high and low, and the dog got the bullets that came down low."
jamesjackson2

James Jackson of St. Augustine, FL – A Confrontation with the Ku Klux Klan

The Movement
The Movement
"...they in turn proceeded to separate us and to beat – to jump on each and every one of us."
walternhale

J. Walter Hale Protested as a Florida College Student

The Movement
The Movement
"We had no protection from the city or county... We would sleep up in the trees... to protect our campus."
5279449524_23b965c6f3_b

Mississippi Freedom Summer, June 1964

The Movement
The Movement
Fannie Lou Hamer helped organize the event for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.
Fanny Lou Hamer, a leader of the Freedom Democratic party, speaks before the credentials committee of the Democratic national convention in Atlantic City, August 22, 1964, in efforts to win accreditation for the group as Mississippi's delegation to the convention.  The Freedom group, composed almost entirely of African Americans, is opposed by the regular all-white Mississippi delegation.(AP Photo)